Lyceum of linguistics and economics
Cambridge university language assessment centre in the russian federation

Book of Academic Policies

British Lyceum

Book of Academic Policies

September 2017

Admissions Policy

Acceleration of Students

Planning Policy

Progression Test Policy

Checkpoint Test Policy

IGCSE Entry Policy

AS and A ‘level Entry Policy

Enrolment and Retention Post 16 Policy

Language Policy

ESL Policy

Modern Foreign Language Policy

Homework policy

Assessment Policy

Review Policy

Report Policy

Handwriting Policy

Literacy policy Primary

Numeracy Policy

Admissions Policy

Prior to an application, parents are welcome to visit the British Lyceum. This can be done by submitting the applicationform and to arrange a convenient date and time. Those parents who are unable to fill in the visit to campuses form can call the admissions office and provide the needed information for the visit.

Our phones are attended from Monday to Friday between 8.30am and 6.00pm.

All prospective pupils come in to school for an assessment. Children entering both primary and secondary should expect to undertake a University of Cambridge ESL assessment. Children entering to the upper secondary school will be expected to do Cognitive Ability Test (CAT) at a cost of 5000 roubles. If students arrives the British Lyceum for the second year of an IGCSE programme they will have to sit a CAT to assess whether they will be able to complete the course in one year or whether we will recommend a two-year programme. All students wishing to Advanced Level courses will have to sit a CAT test

ASSESSMENT

The nature of the assessment is to determine the support or extension programme your child may need at the school. The assessment process is designed to ensure that the placement of all children will best meet their educational and personal requirements. The CAT will provide the school with an approved indicator of potential IGCSE and A ‘Level grades

ACCEPTANCE

Once your child has taken the tests, should there be a place available, we will require you to reserve it as soon as it is possible by completing the Application form and paying the Entrance fee.

Most students join the AIS in September, but we are happy to admit students throughout the year provided that we have places available.

Last update September 2016


Acceleration of Students

Parents are not encouraged to request acceleration of students. Our classes have small numbers and our teachers are well trained in preparing differentiated learning within the classroom to support and extend children.

 In lower secondary school the children are taught English and mathematics and science using:

  • Cambridge checkpoint tests at 11
  • Cambridge progression tests at 12 and 13 years of age
  • Internal testing
  • Teacher recommendation

In upper secondary school the entries to IGCSE core and extension level courses, additional mathematics and English literature are determined by:

  • Checkpoint tests at 14 years of age
  • Internal assessments
  • Reports from other schools
  • Teacher recommendation

Students are only allowed to sit IGCSE if they have proficiency in English. They can follow   the IGCSE courses but exam entry will be determined by the performance indicators within the programme of study. If parents request acceleration of a student from one grade to a higher grade, the issue may be considered after careful investigation of the following:

  • Scores on the Cognitive Ability Test (CAT)
  • The previous Cambridge progression tests
  • General level of classroom achievement
  • Teacher recommendation
  • Chronological age/social readiness/emotional stability.

If the recommendation to accelerate comes via the teacher, then parents must be fully supportive and be aware of the implications. It is not the policy of the school to recommend this type of acceleration unless circumstances are extreme.  Checkpoint tests, cognitive ability tests and progression tests are all benchmark assessments for our students and are good performance indicators as to how children will perform in their year group. Student recommended for acceleration needs to be passed by the deputy director and head teacher. Students should not be accelerated two years ahead in mathematics.


Planning Policy

Philosophy

Planning is the key to effective teaching for learning. It details and dictates what is taught, how it is taught and how pupil’s needs are met. Progressive planning should map and build on existing skills and knowledge. Planning is a key part of the school’s monitoring, evaluation and reporting system, it provides essential feedback to all stakeholders to ensure that statutory requirements are being met. At AIS we believe that failing to plan is planning to fail.

Organisation

Team meetings take place one day a week within subject or year teams. This gives teachers and assistant teachers the opportunity to share expertise and workload. It provides an opportunity to discuss weekly issues, decide upon assessment areas, evaluate the curriculum and ensure that all the necessary planning to deliver the curriculum is in place for the coming week.

Long Term

To ensure a broad balanced and progressive curriculum each year group should have a curriculum map. In addition, each subject area must have a curriculum map which forms the basis for the years planning, ensures children are given a broad and balanced curriculum and that the requirements for the subject are being met. Subject coordinators are responsible for ensuring that curriculum maps are in place and that they are evaluated and updated as necessary. Curriculum maps should be saved on teacher server/curriculum subjects.

Medium Term

Each subject area should have an overview of the term that takes the learning objective, knowledge and skills and blocks them into specific weeks. Activities, differentiation, resources and cross-curricular links may be added to provide a general teaching plan for the term for the non-core subjects. These plans should be word-processed and saved in the teacher server to be used and adapted by future teams. These plans need to be sufficiently detailed to teach subjects without further adaptation. The responsibility for ensuring these plans are in place lies with each subject and year team but if you require further help to create these plans you should seek the support of the subject coordinator.

Weekly or Daily Planning for Core and other Subjects

Weekly planning is a requirement and is adapted from the University of Cambridge Teachers Resource for core subjects and from other resources for other subjects on the curriculum

The Cambridge plans that are ideal starting points for planning. Before being used they should be adapted to the requirements of your year group, to ensure they take into account any differentiation needs.

Certain units of work, particularly those that need more of a cross curricular emphasis, should be planned by the year teams with the subject specialists. Plans must clearly state the days learning objective. They should be organised to show the oral/mental starter, whole class teaching, group work and the plenary for Numeracy and the phonics, shared reading/writing, group work and the plenary for Literacy. Activities, resources and differentiated activities should be recorded including any provision for SEN or ESL. During the part of the lesson dedicated to focus group work, activities are likely to make use of one or more of the following:

  • Practical activities
  • Differentiated tasks
  • Differentiated worksheets or text book activities.
  • Differentiated activity cards
  • A prepared flipchart or whiteboard power point
  • Adult support

The responsibility for creating daily planning and any associated flipcharts, worksheets or activity sheets for lessons lies with the subject and year teams. Wherever possible you are encouraged to share this workload within the team.

Flipcharts

We have invested heavily in IWBs in the belief that they can have an impact upon the quality of learning.  If you use flipcharts, they should:

  • Have a clearly stated learning objective
  • Take into account the different learning styles of our pupils
  • Encourage participation from the pupils

A copy of each Flipchart can be saved on the server within the specific subject folder alongside the relevant planning. These flipcharts will then be available for future teams to use and adapt.

Last updated May 2014


CambridgeProgression Test Policy

Rationale

Cambridge Primary Progression tests are a series of tests, from stages 3 to 9, which are used in the British Lyceum School to monitor progress of individuals and classes of learners. They are used to provide diagnostic feedback which informs us of further teaching and learning, and are used for reporting purposes at the end of the academic year. They are also used to assess the performance of the learners against the Cambridge International Examinations benchmark.

How are they Assessed

Progression tests assess:

  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • English Language or
  • English as a Second Language

The child will receive one of the following awards

  • Gold   – Above average for his/her age group
  • Silver –  Average for his/her age group
  • Bronze – Below average for his/her age group

Who are they for?

Children can be tested with the progression tests from year 3 up to year 9 being entered by the class teacher only if they feel the child will be successful. Any child entered for the progression tests in English or science must have a good reading and writing level of the English language. Mathematics entries will be an informed choice by the class teacher. ESL progression tests should only be done by children if the level is appropriate for the child.

When are they done?

Progression tests for years 3, 4 & 5, then for years 7 & 8, are done in May at the end of the academic year. The previous year’s progression test can be used as an initial assessment for a new academic year if the child missed the progression test the previous year.

Progression tests for years 6 & 9 are done in December or January as mock exams for the checkpoint tests

How are students registered?

Registration will be done by the academic director and updated at the beginning of each year or when a new student arrives and when a current student leaves.

How are the tests administered?

The progression tests are downloaded from the Cambridge Lower secondary website. Marks can be uploaded using the same link where  teachers must click on ‘Upload Marks’ link.

How are the results analysed?

The progression tests are analysed from the Cambridge Lower secondary website. The results can be used as part of their end of year report. The summative report can be used by the school to identify strengths and weaknesses within the school

Last updated March 2014


Cambridge Checkpoint Test Policy

Rationale

Cambridge Checkpoint is a diagnostic assessment tool for the end of the primary phase and lower Secondary phase of education in English, Mathematics and Science. They are used to provide diagnostic feedback which informs us of further teaching and learning, and are used for reporting purposes at the end of the academic year. They are also used to assess the performance of the learners against the University of Cambridge international benchmark.

How are they Assessed

Checkpoint tests assess:

  • Mathematics
  • Science
  • English Language or
  • English as a Second Langauge

The results will be reported in the following way

Checkpoint uses a scale of 1 to 6, 1 being the lowest and 6 being the highest. The results are internationally benchmarked so candidates are judged on the following international scale;

  • 0 – 1       Very Poor
  • 1  - 2       Poor
  • 2  - 3       Below Average
  • 3 – 4       Above Average
  • 4 – 5       Well Above Average
  • 5 -  6       Excellent

Who are they for?

Children can be tested with the checkpoint tests after completing the primary programme in year 6 and the lower secondary programme in year 9. Children will only be being entered by the class teacher if they feel the child will be successful. All children wishing to do the checkpoint examinations must sit the year 6 or year 9 progression tests in December or January as preparation for the examination. Children must score at least a silver level to be entered for the checkpoint tests. A child entered for the checkpoint tests in English or science must have at least ESL, KET level. Mathematics entries will be an informed choice by the class teacher. ESL Young Learners or ESL progression tests can be done by children if the level of English is not appropriate for the checkpoint tests.

When are they done?

Checkpoint tests for years 6 & 9 are done at the end of April. The previous year’s progression test can be used as an initial assessment for a new academic year if the child missed the progression test the previous year. Progression tests for years 6 & 9 are done in December or January as mock exams for the checkpoint tests

How are students registered?

Registration will be done by the curriculum coordinator/examinations officer in January.

How do I administer the tests?

The checkpoint tests must be administered using the guidelines set out in the Cambridge International Examinations Administration Guide for Checkpoint Examinations.

How do I analyse the results?

The Checkpoint Tests are analysed by Cambridge and full summary is sent to the school. These   results   give individual performance scores and a breakdown of the components of the syllabus. They also give a class analysis and details of raw scores


Cambridge ICE IGCSE Entry Policy

Rationale

IGCSE is a two-year programme designed for   the age range of 14 years to 16 years. Students must complete the 2 years of the programme to be eligible to sit the IGCSE exams. The Cambridge ICE is the group award of the International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) and requires the study of subjects drawn from the five different IGCSE subject groups. It gives the British Lyceum the opportunity to benefit from offering a broad and balanced curriculum by recognising the achievements of students who pass examinations in at least seven subjects, including two languages, and one subject from each of the other subject groups. If students arrive for the second year of an IGCSE programme they will have to sit a CAT to assess whether they will be able to complete the course in one year or whether we will recommend a two-year programme

The ICE Curriculum

The Cambridge portfolio of IGCSE qualifications provides a solid foundation for higher level courses such as GCE AS and A Levels and the International Baccalaureate Diploma as well as excellent preparation for employment.

A wide range of IGCSE subjects is available and these are grouped into five curriculum areas, as follows:

  • Group I: Languages
  • Group II: Humanities and Social Sciences
  • Group III: Sciences
  • Group IV: Mathematics
  • Group V: Creative, Technical and Vocational

Candidates hoping to gain the Cambridge ICE group award must enter and sit for at least seven subjects selected from the five IGCSE curriculum areas. The subjects selected must include two (different) languages from Group I (i.e. only one of First Language English and English as a Second Language may count towards Cambridge ICE) and one subject from each of Groups II, III, IV and V. The seventh subject can be taken from any of the five subject groups. Once a student embarks on the programme of study they cannot change subjects to another option after the end of September.

How are they Assessed

Assessment for Cambridge IGCSE includes written and oral tests, coursework and practical assessment. The British Lyceum at present assess the learners using external examinations in most subjects, combining examinations with coursework. Coursework is set and marked by the teacher and externally moderated by Cambridge.

Teachers who have received training from Cambridge, or who possess suitable experience of marking coursework may carry out this assessment. In most subjects there is a choice between core and extended curricula, making IGCSE suitable for a wide range of abilities. Each learner’s performance is benchmarked using eight internationally recognised grades. The guidelines which explain the standard of achievement for different grades are available on the Cambridge website.

Who are they for?

Children can be tested with the IGCSE examinations after completing the programme of study in year 10 & 11. All children wishing to do the IGCSE examinations must sit internal assessment test and mock exams during the two years of the programme as preparation for the examinations. Children must score at least a C grade in assessments and mock exams to be entered for the IGCSE tests. A child wishing to be entered for the IGCSE exams must have achieved at least level 3 in Checkpoint examinations for maths and science or have achieved or working towards PET level in English in order to study for IGCSE exams. In order to sit extension papers children must be scoring at least a level B in internal assessments and mock examinations

Children will not be entered for examinations by the subject teacher if they feel the child will not be successful. The head of department and parent will be informed of the decision. The ultimate decision for entry will be that of the director after consultation with the subject teacher, head of department and parent.

Children entering from systems other than the British curriculum are given a Cognitive Ability Test CAT to assist in placement.  A child may not be admitted if scores on the test given indicate they would not cope with curriculum expectations at Atlantic.  Applications to join the IGCSE programme also have to be considered in terms of subject combination availability and the ability of the pupil to cope with any syllabus content gaps in their educational background. 

The School does, however, reserve the right to admit a prospective student who does not meet the above criteria if it is considered that admission to the British Lyceum is in the best interests of the student and the school.

When are they done?

We enter students for Cambridge IGCSE examination, in the May/June session. Provisional results are issued in August and the official results  by mid-September

How are students registered?

Registration will be done by the examinations officer in January.

How do I administer the tests?

The IGCSE examinations must be administered using the guidelines set out in the Cambridge International Examinations Administration Guide for IGCSE Examinations


Cambridge AS and A’ Level Entry Policy

Rationale

Cambridge International AS and A Levels are internationally benchmarked qualifications providing excellent preparation for university education. They are part of the Cambridge Advanced stage.

Cambridge International AS and A Level qualifications are widely recognised and valued by universities and employers alike. Some US universities give up to a year's credit as a result. Every year, thousands of Cambridge International A ‘Level students gain places at good universities worldwide - including the UK, USA, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. 

Schools and learners find Cambridge International AS and A Levels very flexible. Atlantic international School can offer a combination of the wide choice of subjects available. Learners have the freedom to select the subjects that are right for them - they either follow a broad course of study, or specialise in a particular area. All students wishing to enrol on the advanced level programme must sit a CAT to determine the right programme  for their abilities. Once a student embarks on the programme they cannot change to subjects to another option after the end of the first term 

Cambridge International AS Levels

Cambridge International AS Levels have half the content of the corresponding Cambridge International A Level and may be completed in one year. Atlantic international Schools offers Cambridge International AS Level as a qualification in its own right and as a stage on the way to Cambridge International A Level. Learners can study Cambridge International AS Level alongside other subjects to increase breadth in the curriculum and build further knowledge and understanding to other subjects they are studying at Cambridge International A Level.

Flexibility

British Lyceum and learners find Cambridge International AS and A Levels very flexible. Learners can choose from a range of assessment options:


Option №1 Take all papers of the Cambridge International A Level course in the same examination session, usually at the end of the second year of study    
Option №2 Take a 'staged' assessment route – take the Cambridge International AS Level in one examination session and complete the final Cambridge International A Level at a subsequent session*    
Option №3 Take the Cambridge International AS Level only. The Cambridge International AS Level syllabus content is half an Cambridge International A Level programme.    


* The staged assessment route is not possible in all subjects. The outcomes awarded for Cambridge International AS Level language syllabuses cannot be carried forward to Cambridge International A Level.

Cambridge International AS and A Level syllabuses have been created specifically for an international audience. The content of International AS and A Levels is carefully devised to suit the wide variety of Cambridge schools worldwide and avoid any cultural bias. The structure and administration of Cambridge International AS and A Levels are also designed to meet the needs of our schools and learners around the world. The programme at the British Lyceum does not have a one-year option available for A ‘Levels.

When are they Assessed

At the British Lyceum the Cambridge International AS and A Level examination sessions occur in June, with results issued in August.

Cambridge International AS and A Levels use a wide range of assessment processes and techniques to supplement formal written examinations - orals, practical, projects and coursework of differing types are all used in various subjects where they are the most effective and appropriate means of measuring attainment.

** Some subjects are only available in June or November.

Reporting achievement

Each subject that a Cambridge international student takes at AS and A Level receives a separately certificated grade. From 2010, the Cambridge International A Level will be reported on a grade scale from A* grade, awarded for the highest level of achievement, to E, indicating the minimum required performance. Cambridge International Centres should note there is no A* grading in the certification of Cambridge International AS Levels, which will continue to run from Grade A to Grade E.

Who are they for?

Entry to A-level classes is based on performance in the IGCSE examinations.  Normally, five passes at grade C or above is required, with the expectation of grade B in those subjects taken at IGCSE that the student wishes to pursue at AS level.  Previous school reports will be examined, with emphasis on ascertaining both academic and behavioural suitability for A-level studies.  Applications to join the A-level programme also have to be considered in terms of subject combination availability and the ability of the pupil to cope with any syllabus content gaps in their educational background.
Children entering from systems other than the British curriculum are given a Cognitive Ability Test CAT to assist in placement. If a student wishes to enter the British Lyceum from the local Russian system, a potential one-year study of IGCSE may be necessary. Students with low grades are considered, but only when the Mock exam results indicate considerable potential.  Such students must successfully complete a probationary period, usually of three months’ duration.

Students who have completed one year of study of an A ‘level programme at an overseas school will be accepted onto the programme with CIE, AS exam results or a report from their previous school supporting their application for A ‘Level study. Students without CIE, AS study, exam results will be required to study for two years at British Lyceum.

Students will not be entered for examinations by the subject teacher if they feel the child will not be successful. The head of department and parent will be informed of the decision. The ultimate decision for entry will be that of the Academic Director after consultation with the subject teacher, head of department and parent.

The School does, however, reserve the right to admit a prospective student who does not meet the above criteria if it is considered that admission to British Lyceum is in the best interests of the student and the school.

How are students registered?

Registration will be done by the curriculum coordinator/examinations officer in January.

How do I administer the tests?

The AS and A ‘level examinations must be administered using the guidelines set out in the University of Cambridge Administration Guide for Examinations.

 

Enrolment and Retention Policy post 16

Rationale

Retention in the British Lyceums is an indicator of the efficiency of our education system. The Enrolment and Retention Policy supports the school aim of ‘Raising Achievement of All’. From September 2016 we will have AS qualification for the first group of subjects and from September 2017 we will have A2 examinations. This is a significant development in our schools ‘Programmes of Study’ and this policy aims to set out the strategic changes we will need to make as an school in order to prepare ourselves for the future. Enrolments onto post 16 years Programmes of Study will, from September 2016, take account these changes. Students enrolling onto Advanced Programmes of Study will do so as a two year learner to facilitate the transition from” AS to A2” programmes of study.

Enrolment and Retention Policy

  • Students will be accepted onto the programme after completing the admissions procedure.
  • All students will enrol for a minimum of 3 subjects (AS).
  • tudents whose first language is not English will have to enrol on a Cambridge English programme as part of their studies if they have not chosen English or another language at AS level.
  • Students who are studying  English or another  foreign language at AS level  will be able to enrol onto 4 AS subjects
  • All students will be enrolled as a two year learner

This policy states that ‘Any learner accepted onto a post 16  Programme of Study will be retained by the school for TWO years with no option to re-select for progression to A2 in year two’. All applications for a 3rd year of study will be considered on individual merit by the Academic Director in consultation with subject teachers

Underpinning Strategies to Support this Policy

  • Students must have a minimum of 80% attendance at the end of each academic term unless absence is supported by a registered doctor’s medical certificate.
  • Students must complete all assessed homework and assignments. If a student misses an assignment deadline they may apply for an extension from the subject teacher. 
  • Students must be respectful to all staff and students on the premises
  • Failure to comply
  • If a student fails to meet the minimum standards during the term an action plan will be agreed in the end of term during the ‘student review’.
  • A meeting  with parents will take place at the beginning of the next term and the action plan will be   agreed and signed
  • At the end of the next academic term if the  student has  not   kept  to the action plan the parent will be informed   that we are unable to continue  with the programme of study and the  student  will be asked to leave the school
  • If a student is asked to leave at the end of a term any advanced payments which have been made will be refunded.

Policy agreed October 2016


British Lyceum Language Policy

This Language Policy was developed by the Academic Director and Director of Studies, and is subject to review. All staff at the British Lyceum agree to the content of the policy.

Philosophy Statement

At the British Lyceum, we are a learning community representing a multitude of cultures and languages. We view linguistic diversity at our school as a rich resource for achieving the ideals of intercultural understanding and international mindedness. We believe that the maintenance and development of mother tongue is crucial to cognitive development and maintaining cultural identity. Language is central to inquiry, communication and self-expression in every area of the curriculum and all aspects of life. Thus, the development of language is viewed as a shared responsibility of all members of our learning community. We value all languages and cultures.

Language Policy Introduction

This language policy describes the beliefs and practices around the learning of languages at the British Lyceum (BL). The policy was developed and reviewed in collaboration and consultation with all teaching staff at the school, and all staff are asked to give their commitment so our school can achieve its goals. The policy applies to the whole school, both our Primary and Secondary sections. The policy forms the basis for decision making in the school to ensure that the programmes provided are well organized, well resourced, rigorous and continuous.

Language of instruction and communication

At the British Lyceum, the language of instruction and communication is English. We value and respect the other languages, and languages other than English may be used in social situations where everyone speaks that language, or when necessary to clarify information. We are mindful of the fact that our school community is diverse and multi-lingual, and as such we make efforts to ensure all communication from the school is transmitted in clear, jargon-free English.

Language profile the British Lyceum The language profile at BL is diverse with many first languages present amongst our student population. Overall, less than 20% of our students have English as their first language. Russian first language speakers represent 70% of our student population. Other significant language groups include Turkish, Arabic, Azerbaijan and Polish. A large majority of our staff are from English speaking countries and there is also a significant number of Russian-speaking host country staff. For the remainder of our staff, first languages include French, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, Afrikaans, Pilipino and Indian languages. 

Language Learning in the Primary School

In the Primary Years the Cambridge Primary Programme schemes of work are used for planning, teaching, assessing and reporting on language learning in English, English Language Acquisition (ELA) and Russian. These phase documents are based on the aims of the Cambridge Primary Programme.

Phases of Language Development

The British Lyceum uses the European Councils Framework for Foreign Language learning. The students' language development is described on a continuum of 6 phases, A1,A2,B1,B2,C1,C2 within the four strands of language learning: -

  • Listening
  • Speaking
  • Reading
  • Writing Language 

Viewing and Presenting Within these five phases, outcomes define the individual skills and conceptual understandings students mastered by students at this level. Since students enter phase 1 of language development at different times and at different grade and age levels, one cannot assume that a student is automatically working within the same phase in all strands at the same time.

English Language

English in the Primary School

In the Cambridge Primary Programme language learning takes place in authentic contexts, both within and outside of the Programme of Inquiry. Language is a powerful tool to engage learners and is used by students when negotiating new meanings and understanding new concepts. In the Primary School, we are committed to a guided inquiry approach to language learning. Language is integrated into all subjects; however, stand-alone lessons also occur. The classrooms are language rich environments, with a lot of print and a wide variety of literature available. The curriculum provided builds on students’ prior knowledge and understanding as we use developmental continuums to plan for teaching and learning in language. We aim to provide differentiated learning engagements in the four strands of language. Teachers plan collaboratively for language learning with other teachers, including single subject teachers.

English in the Secondary School

In the Lower Secondary School, all students study English using Global English or First Language English. Students study linguistic aspects of the English language, both in terms of receptive and productive understanding, and they study a variety of text types. They develop their understanding of literary and cultural texts, critical analyses, and create both verbal and written responses that prepare them for the Cambridge progression and checkpoint   tests. Students receive a minimum of 5 English lessons a week, but can be as many as nine depending on the student’s language skills. They are assessed using unit assessments in English mathematics and science and the Cambridge progression and checkpoint tests as summative assessments at the end of each academic year 

In the IGCSE Programme, there are 5 programmes of study for English classes.

English Language choices are:

  • English as Second Language core
  • English as a second language extended
  • English Language first language core
  • English Language first language extended
  • English Literature – Only available to students with a high level of English

First language classes are developing critical and analytical language skills and applying them to various text types, as well as producing a range of linguistic texts, English as a second Language is a language acquisition course.

Students who choose to take AS and A ‘Level studies will have had to follow the extended programme in either English as a second Language or English First Language

The Cambridge Global English programme at the British Lyceum aims to help students develop the language skills needed to participate in the mainstream classroom. When students join the school, their parents are asked to fill out a language profile that describes their previous experience with speaking and learning in English. Should the profile indicate that a student’s mother tongue is not English, and that the student has never used English in a school setting, the student is then referred to the ESL department, where their language skills are assessed. ESL teachers assess students’ needs in order to determine the type and level of support required. Students are assessed using a developmental language continuum. This continuum identifies students’ language proficiency across the domains: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Assessment tools include an oral interview, the ‘Cambridge progression tests in English assessing listening and reading and a comprehension test

Students may be enrolled in a pull-out ESL class, receive in-class support, or receive a combination of the two. ESL pull-out classes are for beginner level students. ESL lessons place emphasis on communicative task-based activities designed to encourage oral communication. As the students’ language skills progress, the class emphasis integrates more classroom content in order to support learning in all subject areas through an inquiry-based approach. In addition, in-class support is an important part of the ESL programme. All beginner students receive push-in support, as do students who are not yet proficient in English. The purpose of in-class support is to ensure that all ESL students are supported with the academic language of the classroom, while allowing them opportunities to interact with their peers. This support will vary in different classes but can include small group work, shared teaching, individual instruction and one-on-one support. When students have reached a standard of competence (according to the exit criteria in the continuum) that allows them to participate actively in their homeroom classrooms, they are exited from the ESL  pull-out programme, and their parents receive a letter notifying them that their child has been exited. This decision is made in consultation with the class teacher. The student’s progress in the mainstream classroom is monitored and further ESL support is available as required.

ESL in the Secondary School

In the Secondary School, we provide two levels of support for students who do not have English as their mother tongue in the Lower Secondary Programme. After a placement process, these learners are grouped into two levels of proficiency: First language English and Global English ESL. The two levels of support are as follows:

  • Students in the first language English class follow the Cambridge English programme for lower secondary and   take the first language English Progression tests and checkpoint tests.
  • Students in the ESL class follow the Cambridge Global English for English language acquisition course, including support in other curriculum areas. If required, an Intensive student may also receive pull-out or in-class support with an English Language Acquisition specialist during a mainstream class. This is done in collaboration with the respective mainstream subject teacher. Students exit the intensive ESL programme once they have achieved a B1 level of proficiency, and the standard ESL class when they have received B2.

Russian Programmes

Russian in the Primary School

All students studying the Cambridge Primary Programme, from Early Learning to year 6, participate in the Russian programme. The Russian programme is in line with the primary approach to language learning. Russian is taught in units of inquiry as well as stand-alone units.

From year 1, students are grouped according to their language proficiency level (developing, intermediate, proficient, advanced). These students have one period of Russian a day. The language levels are defined as follows:

  • Developing Level -  Students who are beginning to learn Russian
  • Intermediate Level - Students who have a basic level of competence
  • Proficient Level - Students who demonstrate a good command of Russian and have in-depth understanding
  • Advanced Level Students who demonstrate a strong command of Russian and have a sophisticated understanding of the language

Subject to the student’s progress, they may change between language level groups anytime during the school year. The teacher, in consultation with the Russian team, makes this decision.

Russian in the Secondary School

In the Lower Secondary Programme all students attend Russian classes, as this is the host country language. Exceptions are only made due to special and clearly defined circumstances (e. g. ELA and LS). Russian classes are divided into ‘Language and Literature’ and ‘Language Acquisition’ courses. The Language and Literature course caters for Russian speakers, while Language Acquisition caters for students for whom Russian is a foreign language. In Language Acquisition, students are grouped according to their ability and linguistic experience. These groups cover A1 to B2 according to the European Council framework. In order to be able to offer the different phases, the school reserves the right to combine year groups and teach according to level. The teachers decide which level is expected to best suit the individual child, considering overall linguistic ability. During the year, a change of group may be recommended if a student is underachieving or performing at a very high level. The teacher, in consultation with the subject leader, takes decisions upon placement.

In the IGCSE programme, the school provides two different courses for Russian. With regards to language acquisition, BL offers Russian State exams, and Russian IGCSE classes for target Russian speakers. These students can choose

  • Russian state Language and literature
  • IGCSE Russian

Students may enter for IGCSE Russian as Foreign Language and enter as a private candidate for edexcel exams

Languages Other Than English

In the Lower Secondary school programme, we offer French, Spanish and German Language Acquisition courses.

Mother Tongue Programmes

Mother Tongue Programme in the lower secondary school for Students in years 7 - 9 whose native language is not English or Russian are able to study their mother tongue as a full lower school programme subject, in addition to English and Russian. Whilst these lessons also take place within the school timetable, tuition costs are covered by the families concerned. These ‘parent supported languages are subject to available teachers. The school has appointed a Mother Tongue Programme coordinator to oversee these programmes. There lessons are scheduled into the timetable.

Mother Tongue Programmes in the IGCSE programme When students enter Grade 10, they are offered the opportunity to study Language and or Literature in their mother tongue, subject to Cambridge availability. if that is their wish. An appointed coordinator for self-taught languages supports these students.

At BL we believe that all teachers are language teachers and share responsibility for students’ language development. Teachers are encouraged to take the ESL in the Mainstream course, which is offered internally every year. To support teachers as language teachers, the ESL department regulary presents workshops focusing on strategies to support ESL learners. The school fosters a culture of language learning; there are opportunities for staff to learn Russian, and for Russian staff to improve their English.

ESL Learning Support

The ESL Team follows both push-in and pull-out models to support English literacy skills for students receiving learning support. Students may be exempt from studying an additional language on the recommendation of the learning support team in agreement with curriculum coordinators and parents. If the support team decides that an individual student would benefit from both learning support and ELS then they may receive support services from both programmes. Learning support services are adaptive, and decrease as the student demonstrates academic progress and becomes more independent in their learning.

 

Whilst our overarching beliefs and philosophy about language teaching and language learning will likely remain unchanged, we acknowledge the fact that language practices do change over time. Therefore, this Language Policy is a document that will be subject to review at least once a year.


English as a Second Language Policy

ESL at the British Lyceum provides students, whose first language is not English, with the Cambridge Global English curriculum which presents authentic listening and reading texts, writing tasks, and culminating unit projects similar to those learners might encounter in a first language school situation - This enables children to take advantage of, not only the school curriculum, but also the social environment of The British Lyceum. The ESL teacher acknowledges that the language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing are interrelated and interactive and the development of linguistic skills depends on a holistic approach that incorporates all four elements. The ESL teachers recognises the importance of the development of the student’s home language as being essential to cognitive growth, as well as enabling the student to retain cultural and emotional stability.

Assessment for Learning

In order to apply this principle, we:

  • Recognise that the beneficial outcomes of language immersion programmes are cumulative and individual.
  • Maintain an ongoing assessment of student language progress and needs. Each student is assessed in reading, writing and oral language through contributions in class to make sure that developmental linguistic progress is being made.
  • Send reports out twice a year.

Effective Teaching and Learning

All the class teachers are involved in the provision of English language teaching to those students whose first language is not English. Cambridge Global English is used as a stand-alone ESL curriculum which is used as part of an innovative suite of materials created by Cambridge University Press for young learners at international schools. -

Curriculum Entitlement and Choice

In order to apply this principle, we:

Use Global English to

  • meet the challenges of the future, children
  • develop both conversational and academic English. from the earliest level,
  • present authentic listening and reading texts, writing tasks, and culminating unit projects similar to those learners might encounter in a first language school situation.
  • developing the listening, speaking, reading and writing skills learners will need to be successful in using authentic English language classroom materials
  • Develop proficiency in English to enable the ESL child to effectively participate in mainstream academic activities.
  • Develop confidence and skills necessary for the ESL child to become fully integrated in the social life of the school.
  • Recognise and provide support for the social and emotional needs of the ESL child, especially during the first few weeks of school.
  • liaise closely with subject teachers in order to:
  1. reinforce, support and extend class work,
  2. provide information and discuss the specific needs of individual ESL children.
  3. Liaise closely with parents to find the appropriate support they can offer their child at home to support the acquisition Of English,

Practical Organisation

ESL students are beginner, intermediate or advanced level. The levels are determined according to initial assessment and their record of achievement in the British Lyceum. British Lyceum has various models of delivery

  • Vertical streaming:

Children are taught ESL each day of the week in a group where all the children are a similar ability. Each Cambridge Stage can have up to 3 groups of learners studying ESL at the same time

  • Differentiation in the classroom

The children will have ESL lessons as a normal part of their curriculum and the work will be differentiated within the class with ESL support

  • Front loading

Children will have intensive ESL when they arrive at school, being withdrawn from main stream lessons   with ESL support

Early years Foundation Stage EYFS 

Lessons take place every day for 40 minutes at an appropriate time during the day. That is early when possible and not during specialist classes. EYFS children focus primarily on speaking and listening skills following the Global ESL Language Programme

Intermediate and advanced groups follow the Global English Language Programme but extra content and context wherever possible is drawn from the mainstream class topic areas.

Stage Two

Lessons take place every day for 40 minutes during class literacy time. KS2 students focus on all skills, reading, writing, speaking and listening with special attention given to weak areas. Language development is guided by the Global English Language Programme for KS2 using mainstream focus areas for context wherever possible. Children can have a withdrawal lesson or in class support. Children focus on their weak skills using classroom content areas as context where appropriate.

Children will be assessed using the Cambridge ESL progression tests  

Stage Three

Initially, children are formally assessed for their knowledge of English structure and ability to write the language. If a new student has not reached the standard to enter all mainstream classes, a programme is created for that student which will best meet his or her needs. However, all ESL children study mathematics, science, art, P.E. sport, and I.C.T.but may substitute ESL for some other subjects.

There are currently Global English classes organised for Years Seven, Eight and Nine using vertical streaming where possible. ESL children at Stage Three study with their peers but may not be studying for the same amount of time each week for the following reasons:

  • A child who needs to consolidate the English they have learnt will study ESL instead of a modern foreign language.
  • More intensive ESL may be required if a student does not have the literacy skills required to join the mainstream English class.
  • Children who join us with very little experience of English may need further ESL which means that they also study ESL instead of humanities.

Each child’s programme is discussed regularly in order to ensure that the needs of the child are being met and good progress is being made. Children can have more or less ESL depending on individual needs but progression to full mainstream classes is by formal, written assessment twice yearly, in January and June. Children will be assessed using the Cambridge ESL progression tests   and can be entered  for the Checkpoint exams if they have achieved PET level of ESL or  silver in  the English progression tests sat in December

Stage Four

ESL children wishing to join the British Lyceum at Stage Four are assessed for their ability with the four skills of English, listening, speaking, reading and writing. A child will have to have a high level of English to join the school. Since this is the IGCSE group, students are required to have a clear understanding of the structure of English and a good ability to express themselves, particularly when writing English. Children will have to the CAT tests  in order to enter the school

To be offered a place at Key Stage Four, a new ESL child requires the ability to cope with both the IGCSE level of study and the high standard of English.

ESL Implementation Practices

Entry to the programme

Applicants are screened through:

  • An ESL progression test to determine their level of English
  • a childs profile form filled in with parents to discuss the student’s prior language learning experience
  • discussion with the head teacher based on initial impressions

 Exiting the ESL programme

  • Exit from the support programme is based on the assessment procedures and consultation with the class teacher.
  • Parents are informed.
  • Students may return for ESL support if they are subsequently struggling in the mainstream class.

Beyond the Classroom

In order to apply this principle, we:

  • Design and teach programmes to develop confidence and skills necessary to enable the ESL students to become fully integrated into the social and academic life of the school.
  • Promote respect and appreciation of the languages and cultures represented by the school community.
  • Inform parents and new teachers of the school’s language programme and language issues such as the importance of ongoing development of the mother tongue.
  • Support and provide training as requested/needed to mainstream teachers re programmes and practices which support ESL students.

Last Reviewed March 2014


Modern Foreign Language Policy

Rationale

At the British Lyceum apart from our education in English, our students have the opportunity to develop their language skills in Russian and by choosing a third language from either French, Spanish or German as a foreign language. This is available from Year 7 to year 11 when it will lead to an GCSE qualification. A further study in a modern foreign language is also available for them at A level if they wish.

Teaching

Our students benefit from small size grouping which allows a good practice in the target language. They learn to use the language in different contexts with an active approach to communication and appealing to different types of learning styles. Our students develop their fours skills (Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing) and all of them are examined at GCSE level.

Aims and Objectives

We aim to provide fun and interactive Modern Foreign Language lessons, following the Common European Framework, for MFL, but also help to give confidence to students to communicate effectively in their chosen foreign language. Use of technology, media and games is an integral part of MFL courses and we put the stress on communication skills and fluency, as well as acquiring precision in writing and a solid base in grammar.

Our aims as languages teachers are:

  • To deliver high quality language education to every pupil through challenging and stimulating learning.
  • To promote awareness, knowledge and understanding of other cultures in an international context.
  • To equip pupils with language skills which have relevance beyond the classroom.
  • To maximise the achievement of every pupil and promote equal opportunities for all pupils.

Last Reviewed September 2016


Homework policy

Rationale

Homework is defined as the time students spend outside the classroom in assigned learning activities. British Lyceum believes the purpose of homework should be to practice, reinforce, or apply acquired skills and knowledge. We also believe, as research supports that moderate assignments completed and done well are more effective than lengthy or difficult ones poorly done.

Purpose

Homework serves to develop regular study skills and the ability to complete assignments independently.  British Lyceum further believe completing homework is the responsibility of the child, and as children mature they are more able to work independently. Therefore, parents play a supportive role through monitoring completion of assignments, encouraging children’s’ efforts and providing a conducive environment for learning.

Homework contributes toward building responsibility, self-discipline and lifelong learning habits. It is the intention of the staff at British Lyceum to assign relevant, challenging and meaningful homework assignments that reinforce classroom learning objectives. Homework should provide students with the opportunity to apply the information they have learned, complete unfinished class assignments, and develop independence.

Time Allocation

Actual time required to complete assignments will vary with each child’s study habits, academic skills, and selected course load. If your child is spending an inordinate amount of time doing homework, you should contact your childs teacher. The class teacher of each year group will produce a homework timetable with the expected return date of the homework

Nursery/reception     Up to 15 minutes of reading* per night, Monday through Thursday    
Year 1    

15 minutes of reading* per night

15 minutes of homework four nights per week, Monday through Thursday

Year 2    

15 minutes of reading* per night

15 minutes of homework four nights per week, Monday through Thursday

Year 3    

15 minutes of reading* per night

20 minutes of homework four nights per week, Monday through Thursday

Year 4    

40-45 Minutes of homework four nights per week, Monday through Thursday

Children may be required to spend time on the weekends for any long-term assignments and required reading    
Year 5    

45-60 minutes of homework four nights per week, Monday through Thursday

Students may be required to spend time on the weekends for any long-term assignments and required reading

Year 6    

45-60 minutes of homework four nights per week, Monday through Thursday

Students may be required to spend time on the weekends for any long-term assignments and required reading

Year 7     15-20 minutes of homework per course, per night, not to exceed one an one-half hours*      
Year 8    20-25 minutes of homework per course, per night, not to exceed two hours*    
Year 9     20-30 minutes of homework per course, per night, not to exceed two and one-half hours*   
Year 10     30 - 40 minutes of homework per course, per night, not to exceed two and one-half hours*    
Year 11    45 – 60 minutes of homework per course, per night, not to exceed two and one-half hours*    
Year 12/13     Homework as appropriate for the completion of the programme    

Children should be encouraged to read for pleasure on weekends and vacations. * Reading also includes having adults reading to children. If a child is experiencing difficulty, parents/guardians have the option of signing off at the upper time limit for completing homework, if the child has worked studiously and has produced quality work.

Homework Policy Guidelines for Students

  • Always do your best work
  • Record directions for homework in an assignment notebook. 
  • Understand assignments clearly before leaving class
  • Bring home the proper materials to complete the assignments 
  • Hand in completed assignments on time
  • Budget time properly for long-term assignments
  • Complete any work missed due to absence from class
  • Understand how homework will affect your class grade
  • Talk to your parents and teacher if you are having difficulty with homework
  • Homework will not be assigned during school vacation except for the completion of previously assigned long-term projects.

Homework Policy Guidelines for Parents

  • Be familiar with the philosophy and guidelines of the homework policy
  • Check your child’s assignment notebook
  • Provide a time and place to do homework assignments with limited interruptions
  • Actively supervise homework completion, assisting, but not doing the work
  • Oversee completion of long-term assignments to assist in understanding time management
  • Contact the teacher with questions or concerns especially if your child exceeds the allotted time frame
  • Homework will not be assigned during school vacation except for the completion of previously assigned long-term projects.

Homework Policy Guidelines for Teachers

  • Assign homework on a regular basis in keeping with the homework policy
  • Assignments may be on a daily basis or of a long-term type, such as a report
  • Students are to understand clearly all homework assignments
  • Require that each student have an assignment book
  • Homework may take the form of class, group, or individual assignments
  • Group projects should not be assigned as homework, unless students can work on their individual parts independently
  • Teachers should coordinate assignments, tests, and projects with other teachers, as appropriate, to avoid overburdening students.
  • Assignments should be discussed, checked and when appropriate, corrected and returned to students
  • Specific policies/practices of teachers are to be submitted to the principal and clearly communicated to students and parents
  • Teachers have the responsibility to communicate with parents of students who are falling behind in completing homework assignments
  • Homework will not be assigned during school vacation except for the completion of previously assigned long-term projects.

Homework Policy Guidelines for Administrators

  • Include this homework policy in all teacher, parent and student handbooks
  • Require teachers to communicate homework policy to students and parents
  • Make certain that teachers are implementing the homework policy consistently and uniformly
  • Assist teachers, when necessary, in implementing this homework policy
  • Observe use of homework during classroom visits
  • Review homework samples and assignments periodically
  • Give suggestions to teachers, when necessary, on how assignments could be improved
  • Develop homework incentive programs/practices with teachers and parents to assist and enhance homework completion 

Last reviewed May 2014


Assessment Policy

Assessment is the means by which the progress of pupils is monitored.  It is a tool to inform curriculum planning and learning programmes.

Why do we assess?

  • To define each child's ability: what the child knows understands and can apply.
  • To reveal children's strengths and weaknesses.
  • To ensure early identification of children with S.E.N
  • To inform future planning and target setting: to ensure continuity and progression in our work with the children.
  • To communicate accurate information about the child that is useful to teachers, pupils, parents, and other educational agencies.
  • To comply with statutory requirements.

Strategies for assessment

  • Observation - watching the children on task.
  • Questioning/discussion with the children.
  • Photographing/videoing/audio taping work in progress.
  • Examining children's written work.
  • Marking children's work, according to the marking policy.
  • Teacher devised tests for areas such as spelling, tables.
  • Statutory formal assessments:

Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS)

  • Profiling, internal formal assessment, at nursery, reception,
  • Unit assessments for maths English, ICT and science in year 1 and year 2
  • Reading profiles

Primary

  • Reading profiles
  • Unit assessments for maths English, ICT and science in year 3, 4, 5 & 6
  • English, mathematics, English as a second language and science progress certificates from the University of Cambridge
  • External Checkpoint assessment at Year 6 in English, mathematics, and science 
  • ICT external assessments year 6

Lower Secondary

  • Unit assessments for maths English, ICT and science in year 7, 8 & 9
  • Internal formal assessment, year 7 to year 9 in all subjects
  • ESL assessments for all children except native speakers
  • English, mathematics, English as a second language and science progress certificates from the University of Cambridge
  • External Checkpoint assessment at Year 9 in English, mathematics, and science
  • ICT external assessments year 9

Upper secondary

  • Internal formal assessment, year 10 and year 11
  • IGCSE a minimum of 7 subjects leading to the International Certificate of Education (ICE) chosen from 5 curriculum areas as follows:
  1. Group I:  Languages
  2. Group II:  Humanities and Social Sciences
  3. Group III:  Sciences
  4. Group IV:  Mathematics
  5. Group V:  Creative, Technical and Vocational

All candidates for the ICE must enter and sit at least seven subjects. These must include two (different) subjects from Group 1 (Languages) (i.e., Spanish, Russian and English as a Second Language may count towards and ICE) and one subject from each of Groups II, III, IV and V. The seventh subject can be taken from any of the five subject groups

  • Russian State examinations for students wishing to enter Moscow state university
  • ESL assessments for all children except native speakers 16+ advanced study
  • IGCSE, Advanced Supplementary, (A’S) and Advanced Level Studies (A ‘Level). Students combine IGCSE, A’S and A ‘level studies to prepare themselves for University and/or employment.
  • Russian State examinations for students wishing to enter Moscow state university
  • ESL

Planning for assessment

Assessment is built into planning and takes place.

  • During each topic
  • Each half term's work
  • During internal assessment done at the end of term 2 and term 4. 
  • Weekly plans show assessment focus with an asterisk and any relevant comments on the reverse, or added to individual records.

Below is a flow diagram for the assessment process:

A year overview will be drawn up annually, to enable staff to see the development of assessment throughout each academic

Record Keeping

Nursery and Reception complete records based on Desirable Outcomes.  If some children complete the Desirable Outcomes record in Reception, then a National Curriculum record may be started.

From Year1 onwards, individual records are kept for the core subjects (including ICT).  Teachers keep their own informal notes to assist filling in school records.

Separate records are kept for ESL.

Staff working with children who have English as a second language fill in these records, in consultation with ESL staff.

  • Portfolios in Early Years& The school is building up portfolios of work for the core subjects.  They are used to illustrate school judgments of United Kingdom National Curriculum/Desirable Outcome attainment.  It will contain evidence of work collected from all classes from
  • Reception to Year 2. Reflecting work from ability bands within a Year group.   It will also be used as a tool to reflect on continuity and progression within school.
  • Unit assessment

In maths English, science and ICT there will be unit assessments to measure progress. This will be reported as a Percentage scored in the end of unit assessment.

Moderation in EYFS

Regular moderation takes place each term.  Cross phase groups analyse children's work against the university of Cambridge Outcomes.

Special Educational Needs and IEPs

Assessment should reflect the school policy on SEN.

Any children experiencing difficulty in making progress in line with expectations for their age will have an ILP.  ILPs are reviewed regularly, to enable pupils to progress.

Target Setting

Analysis of assessment data is made by the Senior Management team.  Overall percentages are reported to directors, and parents

Targets based on Cambridge levels are set in June for each child, for the end of the next academic year. When planning, specific focus groups are highlighted and special consideration is made about how to deploy support staff.  These targets are reviewed each term to ascertain if the children are 'on track' to achieve their targets

Individual targets are set for English and Mathematics each half term.  These targets are shared with both children and parents.

Reporting to parents

Parents are invited to attend a parents' evening each term at which staff discuss progress and targets for their child.

Reports are completed for parents three times during the year.

October: First report

December: Midyear report

May/June: End of year report

Year 3 and Year 9 parents receive their child's University of Cambridge assessments with their end of year report.

Parents are given the opportunity to discuss the contents of the report in the end of term 2 and summer term parents' evening

Recording and Reporting to Parents

Teachers will maintain a mark book in which assessments are recorded. These records will take the form of percentages or IGCSE, AS and A ‘Level grades for 15+. In the case ICT, assessment may reflect the level at which assignments are completed, for example Pass, Merit or Distinction. These will form the basis of judgments made when reporting to parents.

Interim/Termly Reports.

Teachers are required to complete and record unit assessment and progress reports.

Annual Reports

Teachers are required to produce an annual, written report on student progress and attainment at the appropriate calendared time, commenting on current progress toward targets, attitude to learning, quality of independent work and adherence to deadlines. Strategies for improvement must be given.

Reporting student progress.

Interim/Termly Reports.

Teachers are required to record data which will enable them to generate termly assessment and progress reports. The data to be entered will be

  • Current Level of Progress.

This is the level/ grade the student will achieve at the end of the year/ course if they continue to work at current pace and level. This judgement must be capable of being evidenced through assessment of student work, examination results and unit test scores. Subject teachers and class teachers are responsible for completing reports, and are responsible for ensuring the accuracy and reliability of the data. Expectations are that

  • All members of staff who have responsibility for the learning of students should ensure that student’s work is marked regularly, giving a percentage grade.
  • A formal assessment of work should be carried out following the school assessment calendar. Teachers should award Current Level of Progress grades in line with the following definitions:

Attitude to Learning – Effort

Grade Descriptor     Evidence    
Excellent     Excellent attitude to learning. Keen, enthusiastic and interested in learning. Responds very well to staff guidance and is a role model for peers. Actively engages in lessons. Takes pride in work, meets deadlines and produces high quality work independently. Homework is completed on time and to a higher than target grade standard.    
Very Good     Good behaviour and effort shown in most lessons. Willing to learn. Generally positive in accepting staff advice.Meets deadlines and works independently at an acceptable level. homework is completed on time to target grade standard    
Satisfactory     Co-operative but sometimes not actively involved in the lesson. Behaviour and effort is unacceptable on some occasions. Often misses deadlines and/or produces inadequate work when engaged in independent learning tasks. Needs to use planner more consistently. homework completed but below target grade standard, further work is required to improve it    
Below Average     Behaviour and effort frequently fails to meet the expectation of the school and can disrupt the learning of others. Frequently fails to meet deadlines or to attempt or complete independent learning tasks. Homework is incomplete    

Below are guidelines to the grade descriptors for effort and attainment for IGCSE, AS and A ‘level that will be reported to parents, in the school report.

Attainment

Cambridge International Examinations provides internationally benchmarked objectives and assessment criteria for each core subject. Teachers at the British Lyceum teaching core and non-core subjects develop tasks and strategies in alignment with the CIE standards to help their students reach the subject objectives. Interim objectives and modified assessment criteria are used for each particular stage of learning. The CIE provides externally set examinations at the end of year 6 and year 9 and internally assessed assessment for all other years of   primary and lower secondary for the core subjects of English, mathematics and science. CIE assessment aims to support student learning by providing feedback on the learning process. It aims to identify what students understand at different stages in the learning process. Teachers and students are continuously, actively engaged in assessing student progress. Below are guidelines to the grade descriptors for effort and attainment for Cambridge IGCSE, AS and A’ Level that will be reported to parents, in the school report.

Cambridge International Examinations Attainment Grade Guidelines

Grade     Grade Descriptor     Evidence    

Gold 80% +    

Excellent     A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the ability to apply them almost faultlessly in a wide variety of situations. There is consistent evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation where appropriate. The student consistently demonstrates originality and insight and always produces work of high quality.  

Silver 70% - 80%    

Very Good     A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the ability to apply them in a wide variety of situations. There is consistent evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation where appropriate. The student generally demonstrates originality and insight    

Silver 60%  - 70%

Satisfactory